554 Comments
Mar 28·edited Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

Open thread:

KPower are now swapping the robust K-series honda engines into the NC Chassis MX-5 miata. They offer full service installs as well, for a flat labor fee of $2950.

Let us all imagine the Miata as it was supposed to be, with a roots-blown K-series, and pray:

"Lord, protect me from the things I want, and my want of things."

Src: https://kpower.industries/blogs/news/how-does-the-k24-nc-stack-up-to-the-original-kmiata-swap

Src: https://kpower.industries/blogs/news/big-news-bmw-transmission-upgrade-for-your-miata?_pos=8&_sid=ad88c93fa&_ss=r

Src: https://mercracing.net/shop/mr1320-tvs-supercharger-kit/

Note they're also doing full K-swaps for the FR-S/BR-Z for a mere 3 grand: https://kpower.industries/pages/turn-key-swaps

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author

Relevant to my interests, because my wife runs in two classes (SCCA STU and NASA ST5) that would permit a K-swap.

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Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

For those of us unfamiliar with the rules, what would the limitations be?

Displacement, compression ratio, power at tire, ???

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author

NASA ST classes are dyno-sheet power to weight with various mod factors.

SCCA ST classes are based on displacement and weight with various mod factors.

This is because the SCCA isn't a bunch of morons.

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Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

$3k labor for a full engine swap of a modern fuel injected engine into a modern chassis seems pretty darn cheap! K24 into an FR-S sounds awesome.

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Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

This is a legitimate option if you set aside 25-30k for everything...

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author

The Cut strikes again, and the girls are BIG MAD:

https://www.thecut.com/article/age-gap-relationships-marriage-younger-women-older-man.html

Get your popcorn ready!

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author

To follow up:

One of my college classmates who remains a close friend sent it to me before I had had a chance to check NY Mag’s website today. He is absolutely their core demographic - 35, highly educated, lives in the West Village, and taking the year off to figure out what he wants to do next (he made $3-4MM after his employer - a startup - sold).

He noticed that a female classmate of ours had “liked” The Cut’s post about the article on Instagram; this surprised me. She is also, obviously, ~35. Moderately attractive, perma-single (or at least no man has made it to social media, and she has attended a number of weddings and parties over the years). She is from a very wealthy Charleston family; she owns a house there and has a place in NYC (hybrid schedule NYC CRE job).

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Mar 28Liked by Sherman McCoy, Jack Baruth

I know so many of these women from college.

Some of them, last I saw them 5 or 10 years ago, were breathtakingly, stop-you-in-your-tracks-on-the-sidewalk beautiful.

Alas, so many of them are such pains in the ass that they're destined to die alone.

All that potential. Multiple thousands of years of conscientious breeding to produce such exemplary creatures...

all of that effort and work... POOF!... gone

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author

As I commented below, I have nothing negative to say about this woman.

As is fairly widely known on here, I earned an undergrad degree at a small, elite, and certainly elitIST liberal arts college situated in a small town in Virginia. There was literally nothing to do except go to class, study, drink, and (occasionally) sleep.

I was probably in the middle of the bell curve for males in terms of alcohol consumption - about 50 a week (I drink less than 50 drinks a year now). The women drank quite a bit, too. My close male friends and I have observed that virtually all of the women, whether single or partnered, are in far better physical shape than they were when we were in college.

Despite that fact, a number of the women seem to have (voluntarily) given up on finding a husband and/or becoming a mother. Of the most beautiful women in my class (of about 400 grads total):

-One is from a sizable, big money Texas family. She earned a top MBA, lived a charmed life in NYC, got laid off during COVID, and now lives in a small, unremarkable town in rural New England with her dogs. She abandoned the G-wagen and platinum blonde and couture for bangs, bad tattoos, and a Subaru.

-One earned an Ivy League grad degree in applied mathematics (after having earned a BA in Philosophy and a BS in Math) before moving to LA to be a stylist. She lives in Echo Park and posts frequently about her various mental illnesses, the patriarchy, etc. She got married and divorced last year.

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Mar 28Liked by Sherman McCoy, Jack Baruth

I clicked like on the comment, because well-told, but allowing such cruel fates to befall these women's lives makes me shudder.

My college experience similarly combined elitism, challenging academics, and probably the best beauty-to-brains ratio in all of american collegiate life at the time. Difficult to draw comparisons. But it felt like the Studio 54 of its day.

Your stories are just like mine.

The facially flawless, 9.5/10 5'4 waif with the best drawing ability in art classes and 9 figures of connecticut wealth: cats

The gorgeous, zaftig-in-the-cool-way-not-Bryce's-girls east-coast daughter of a local law and political dynasty: MANY cats

Of all the things we've so badly fucked up... how did *this* particular unforced error come to pass?

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author

I wonder what their parents have said or done?

The Texas girl has siblings who achieved far less academically but are married with children.

The LA stylist has a brother who is gay; their stepfather is a billionaire whose own children reproduced.

Another girl who is not *particularly* attractive but was genuinely nice and down to earth (nothing to prove) works for the investment bank her multi-billionaire father owns (she looks like him wearing a wig). Mid-30s, single, no kids. Her best friend married her brother. Without giving everything away (this is a public thread), you can probably guess where I went to school, which makes it easy to figure out the family I’m talking about here (hint - the I bank is HQ’d in Little Rock and is a sponsor of the Williams F1 team).

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Mar 28Liked by Sherman McCoy

Agreed. I REALLY wonder about the parenting part.

And what media, friends and environments shaped them

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Mar 28Liked by Sherman McCoy, Jack Baruth

This is why the Bene Gesserit would never work in real life.

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Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

Perhaps. If I'm understanding the gom jabbar correctly they're doing what they're doing at gunpoint-

-and a lot of things work at gunpoint that mightn't otherwise

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author

Like getting a nation of people to file taxes!

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Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

bet shes miserable

do you have her insta by chance

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author

It’s private.

I have nothing bad to say about her, and I keep in touch with her intermittently.

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Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

As the world burns to the ground, I find the ironies of postmodern society often feel like little victories... the world treats boys like defective girls, but the result is that women became defective men.

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Brilliant!

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Mar 28Liked by Sherman McCoy, Jack Baruth

Ugh. "The oppression of marriage". Then why do women seem to get the best deal out of divorce? I got a buddy going through a nasty divorce and I'm not sure his soon to be ex was oppressed.

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Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

Is your buddy a “ CIS-male?”

WELL THEN OF COURSE SHE WAS!!1!

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They split it right down the middle, and gave her the better half?

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It's nasty because of kids and nasty because they were marry for all of 18 or so months.

There was no infidelity. She just thought she could stay at home and be a content creator without actually taking care of the kids while he was doing a real job.

I don't have a problem with splitting it down the middle of the SAHM or SAHD does their actual job. The problem is men can get screwed on this front.

Maybe judges should assign some real value here and if that part of the contract isn't held up then maybe you don't get half?

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In a just world, it would be like that. In the real world, my wife thought she could stay at home and be an alcoholic without actually taking care of the kids while I was doing a real job. When the divorce was final I got the kids and she got 60% of our assets. If there was any justice she would have left with her personal effects and not a damn thing more.

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Mar 28Liked by Sherman McCoy, Jack Baruth

Look, I'm boomer and as right wing and anti snowflake as the rest of this readership, but.....I liked the piece. I thought it was well written, thoughtful, and truthful. The author came across not as a dingbat, but a smart pragmatic young woman who perfectly executed the OODA loop within her environment. She observed her status and choices, oriented, decided her way forward, and acted. Admittedly, her brother may be slightly pissed! Thanks for this Sherman.

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author

I enjoyed it, as well.

I anticipated that it would set the tongues wagging in here, which is why I shared it. The comments on the website and on the Instagram post were predictable.

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Mar 28Liked by Sherman McCoy, Jack Baruth

I'm three paragraphs in, and she's said nothing indefensible. It's just not a high-status outlook or "luxury belief" to hold - thus controversial to some.

People [outside of here] may not know this but pure, individualistic "for love" marriage is a nigh-unprecedented luxury of the postwar industrialized middle-class-or-better West. Most other civilizations still have parental input into marriage and most WESTERNERS would have had substantial parental input if not something along the lines of arrangement had they been living in 1910.

Big age gaps work for everyone. He gets youth and beauty and at least some of her best years; she lets him spend time in the investment banking salt mines for a decade+, he gets to enjoy strange women for a decade+ and she gets to take vague, purblind stabs at career before being politely allowed to stop maintaining the illusion of caring.

Honestly it totally makes sense. Kudos to this woman, who seems happily matched.

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author

Be sure to dig into the comments.

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Mar 28Liked by Sherman McCoy, Jack Baruth

Holy shit they're great. thanks!

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Mar 28Liked by Sherman McCoy

Women really don't like each other.

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Mar 28Liked by Sherman McCoy

Stopped about ten paragraphs in.

If she’s happy, and he’s happy, what more matters?

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Mar 28Liked by Sherman McCoy

2 paragraphs in and the Harvard Grad. was looking for a dude to "Settle" with.

Further down "A date, days later. A second one, where I discovered he was a person, potentially my favorite kind: funny, clear-eyed, brilliant, on intimate terms with the universe."

For fuck's sake.

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Mar 28Liked by Sherman McCoy, Jack Baruth

There is nothing wrong with women who are this clear-eyed and merciless about it all.

Life is merciless

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Mar 28Liked by Sherman McCoy

someone told her commas were free and she went nuts

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Hahaha 🤣😂

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Mar 28Liked by Sherman McCoy

Further down some more. What she says about her brother and girlfriend? She's a complete asshole. They are going to read this. I'd have nothing to do with the buffoon.

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That woman is so close to getting it. She puts the words down herself but still can't see. The stuff about girlfriends fixing up their boyfriends but not getting the long term benefit. The observations about two people stumbling to grow up together. "I pictured a three-legged race, two people tied together and hobbling towards every milestone." Well that's the whole point of a marriage, isn't it? The wife helps the husband grow up and she herself is there to benefit until the end.

The author felt herself to be too valuable at age 20 and decided to skip all that. Now she's empty, although still married, and writing for free on the internet. She sees everything more or less accurately but can't analyze the problems at all. She writes she'll expect a lot from him when raising a child. After she admits herself that he has done basically everything for her over a decade? At what point does she carry her own weight? They'll hire a nanny and she'll be posting about divorce in five years.

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Mar 28Liked by Sherman McCoy, Jack Baruth

The comments there on that are even better. I particularly like the ones from KumKum. No baggage there. No Sir Ree.

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Mar 28Liked by Sherman McCoy

why did i read the whole thing

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Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

Nelson voice 'HA HA'

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Mar 28·edited Mar 28Liked by Sherman McCoy

why would sherman do this

he made me read about some navel gazing waif whinging about aging and stuff

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He was attempting to FORCE you to learn speed-reading (critical in information age)

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Mar 31·edited Mar 31

thank you sherman

digesting massive volumes of pointless words was a skill i picked up in school

i dont remember any of it

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Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

The guy married her. She might have the looks of an "11" on a 10 scale for all we know. I think he's a fool and it wasn't worth it.

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"Her looks make her an 8. Then she opens her mouth and instantly becomes an Ohio Hard 4."

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Getting old sucks.

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67. Tell me about it. 27? Not so much.

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she spent the whole piece saying just that

tiring

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She'll be self-deleting by 35. She's already lived a hard life and 35 will be her golden years.

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Sometimes I think that women, under the influence of feminism and leftist nonsense have permanently damaged relationships between women and men. Women have allowed themselves to be convinced that they they're all high value and that most men simply don't live up to their now high standards. Sort of a Bizzaro Lake Wobegone where only half of the population is all above average. When I ask them how that math works out they just say that men "aren't keeping up", which would mean there's been a massive change in the past generation or two after thousands of years of human society. They believe that women have finally thrown off the shackles of the patriarchy. They simply can't compute the notion that women have had an equal role in shaping society and that the patriarchy is a fiction.

They put a lot of stock in their financial independence and the fact that they don't need a man. Then they go on Facebook singles groups wearing their casual misandry on their designer sleeves in filtered photos taken from the most flattering angles, ready to take offense at just about anything if expressed by someone with a Y chromosome, and simultaneously complain that they are single and that there are no men worthy of them.

It's very depressing.

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And, of course, bigger picture is that on the exact same arc of women rising to lead modern society - more women in Congress, more women running large corporations, more women in professional careers - modern society has suddenly turned into a frantic, dysfunctional dystopia where everyone is vain, talks a lot, and no one seems to know how anything actually works...

Weird.

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how could this have happened

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Well said!

What confounds me is that the political right, such as it exists, has not been able to *capitalize* on leftist lies through truth-telling.

Obviously censorship plays a part, but amazed that the truth is just so well-hidden and so well-lied-about. Blog-dot-jim says the truth is the right's best weapon, but this doesn't seem to be the case, at least at the moment

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Assuming a 50/50 split in sexes, I find the line "Those guys are going to be lonely later" odd when it's used by many. Which may be true, but unless polygamy takes hold or the women go lesbian, if it's not those lonely guys not stepping up, which guys are they going to hook up with for the long haul.

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They think they're above those lonely guys. They think their grandmother settled for their grandfather.

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So I'll add to this that this girl went to the same high school as my wife in Miami and was taught by my sister-in-law there. She just sent this article our way, and if you know Miami and know that the author is a Miami girl, it does make a lot more sense given the values of too many folks down there.

Given what she wanted, you do have to admire her for willing to dive in and go and get it. In that regard she's not too different than other elite school girls, it's just that her chosen "vocation" was a bit of a throwback.

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Can anyone explain which purpose the HDMI meant to serve? I read that part twice and am still confused.

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author

A prop to explain her presence at the HBS party (is how I read it).

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Is the implication that the cord fit the party's theme?

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author

Just that the party might have involved multimedia.

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A connection so that they could show a video?!

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Did not yet read past the title, but I will. Don't think this is anything new- what was the maiden name of Mrs Irving Berlin?

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Mar 28Liked by Sherman McCoy, Jack Baruth

So you’re saying a Hyundai crashed in Baltimore. Have we conclusively ruled out teenage gangs being responsible?

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Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

The lights went out when they hacked it with a cell phone.

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founding

You say this but bridge lights are pretty vulnerable.

Many bridge lights be effectively turned on/off by radio signal for moments when a boat is passing through. Also, there’s a lot of industrial lighting controllers that both have their management interfaces open to the internet and still use default credentials. This means that your “fancy” bridges with RGB LED arrays (or even the Vegas sphere if configured similarly) can be tampered with by just about anyone with a pulse.

https://codykretsinger.com/info/This-Little-Light-of-Mine.html

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Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

Sad, comic, twist: someone was on the Key Bridge trying to hack a road crew's Hyundai (car) but accidentally hacked the Maersk's Hyundai (ship).

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author

That's no Palisade... that's a CARGO SHIP!

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Well, I didn't see 37 cops behind it with their guns drawn, screaming "DRIVER, SHOW ME YOUR HANDS!!!"

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That sentence is about 7 "FUCKING"s short. IF YOU FUCKING <inaudible> I WILL FUCKING KILL YOU. DON'T MOVE! WALK FUCKING BACKWARDS TOWARD ME!"

It's the key putting the citizen, presumed innocent, at ease so that you can cooperatively resolve the situation.

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Of course! The fuck is wrong with me?

I really have no excuse, watching all those cop cam vids on YouTube.

Wisconsin is wall-to-wall scumbags, apparently.

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I have seen more GOOD police behavior from Wisconsin than bad. Either they're just good at propaganda or maybe trying to make up for the Konerak Sinthasomphone thing (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeffrey_Dahmer#Late_20s_and_early_30s:_subsequent_murders)

I'm a little reluctant to go to Arizona or Colorado.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AhWF239Bclg

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They're exemplary in their patience, explaining to Tyvequious for the 17th time that they're arresting him for Possession With Intent To Distribute, Resisting Arrest and Assaulting A Police Officer without raising their voices.

When the guy clearly deserves a wood shampoo and rough ride to the county jail.

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Might be a LITTLE early for that!

Still—ouch! 😲

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Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

I'm dealing with the race to the bottom at work right now...I helped hire a former employee back under a contract house (he used to be direct) at like 75% of his former salary and crappy benefits. His family is on vacation for Spring Break but he stayed behind to work because he has like 10 vacation days all year. He get no bonus, fewer holidays, unpaid sick days, and is under constant pressure to perform in an environment where cutting him loose is a phone call away at the mercy of our boss, essentially.

This is the new normal. We just don't hire direct anymore. We have people with no skin in the game tasked with managing complex engineered systems while we pay them less than they're worth.

I'm pissed. It isn't fair. It isn't just. It isn't the way we should treat people.

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author

I'm on a 90 day contract right now, and I feel this in my bones.

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Mar 28·edited Mar 29Liked by Jack Baruth

Good man. There is a lot of skeleton crew operation going on in a lot of companies, certainly from the service industry. The elements that have put that into motion don't show signs of reversing course and I don't yet see an easily worked out solution. I've next to zero response on job applications and inquiries for, well, too long in my book. Even for positions I may be overqualified for or simply more entry level positions (which are in no way beneath me). Everybody's hiring but nobody's hiring.

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Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

That story sounds similar to one my fiancé told me about one of her colleagues... Any chance this is taking place at a major automaker who's former world headquarters in A.Hills has a big star on the top?

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Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

Former!?

HashtagTriggered

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Well let's be honest, as much as I love ol Momma Mopar in my heart, it's not exactly an American company anymore, and I'll be surprised if there isn't a Micheal Perna real-estiate sign up by the end of 2025.

Examples like this direct-to-contract demotion and the events of last Friday are an example of how PSA is simply going to gut everything in a way Cerberus or Daimler only dreamed they could have. That being said, there is irony in the fact that management is asking for more in-person "work" to be done, and adding more traffic enforcement on campus from AHPD... shame really, cause I did enjoy allegedly seeing how fast I could "dodge" potholes on the ring road.

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I will admit that I am part of the problem wrt the AHPD presence. Why wait for red lights on a private road when there’s no traffic, amirite?

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You certainly are! I'll take some blame as well. I don't even work there, but I work nearby, so the lady and I carpool when she has to go in. I have to imagine a few people were unnerved by a Compass maintaining double-nickel speeds all the way around to the north end. Not that there was anyone really around to witness such a thing.

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founding

Just come work in the city. Every red light is a rolling 4-way stop if you have the bigger vehicle.

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The gutting is curious, because the American arm makes all of the money. That the most profitable products are all very specific to the North American market gives me hope that some semblance of former Chrysler survives to keep designing and building them.

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Jeep and Ram aren't going anywhere, no. It is also good that they still actually build some of these in the city of Detroit as well.

The gutting, though, is happening in the American engineering base. Their plan is literally replacing local, experienced, but expensive engineers with remote engineering in "lower cost countries." Most all the engineers based in CTC will eventually be replaced with someone who's never seen a Wrangler or a Ram, and maybe never will, but they will be 80% of the cost to employ. Stallantis is calling this "efficiency." Eventually, they won't need CTC anymore (there's already been talks of selling the place) because all the positions formerly based there will be in India and Mexico, and the positions that STLA believes should stay expensive will be filled by the French. I don't see it ending with good cars that Americans want to buy, but that's obviously the goal.

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Yeah, I've read articles to that effect regarding CTC sale and offshoring of engineering. I just don't want to believe that management would shift responsibility for hyper-American products overseas where, as you say, the locals have never even seen a Wrangler or Ram. Since, with rare exception, Chrysler had never been strong in midsize and smaller vehicles, I'm almost OK with the competency centers for those products living elsewhere. (And by that I mean France and Italy, not India.) But I sure hope something of Chrysler survives in Auburn Hills.

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Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

Thanks for being a decent dude about it.

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A lot of companies try and shuffle employees as contractors. If he's not really a contractor, BIG fines. If it's a big company, I'd think they know the rules well enough but a lot of companies don't.

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He wasn’t converted, he left a couple-three years back to work for a startup. The startup folded and I submitted his resume for a job back here again.

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Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

Randomness about various subjects:

1. Guntherwerks and social media influencers - I see this in the gun world, too. The value of the product to your life or shooting is inversely proportional to how many "influencers" are talking to you about it, and exactly inversely proportional to how much "lifestyle marketing" is used to push it. Sigarms' "Legion" marketing is an excellent example of this. It's a Sig, with certakote and maybe a couple of nice to have features (SAO on a P226 isn't bad) but there's a challenge coin and a "community" that you have to buy the "Legion" to join, and...

No, thank you. To quote what we would have said when we were 19: That's gay.

2. The Radical and the halo: In my second go through college I took forensics as an elective because it seemed like it would be mildly fascinating and it fit my working full time plus running a side hustle plus trying to get another degree schedule. It was more than mildly fascinating, as I ended up having Dr. Drew Richardson as my professor for that class. Dr. Drew was formerly the head of the FBI's Chem/Bioweapon unit, one of the last of the people in the Bureau who carried a gun as an agent AND who had a PHD. These days the Bureau prefers the gun toters, the number crunchers, and the people who use a pipet to be kept neatly apart.

He was one of the world's foremost experts on the polygraph and fought the Bureau to try and get rid of it for essentially any personnel screening. He was also a bit of a contrarian as he was one of the few voices in the wilderness saying that a lot of what is considered "forensic science" has precious little actual science behind it. The sound of that drum is still softer than it should be today, but it's getting louder.

The dude loved paragliding and did it as much as he could. He had great videos of it in just about every class.

Dr. Drew and I hit it off right away because the first day of class he saw I was reading a book on Delf Bryce and in a class filled with mostly disinterested college students and one active duty police officer trying to advance in his career and already hopelessly out of his depth, I was the guy he could "vibe" with. Delf was a heavy influence in FBI firearms and tactics, although I'd argue an entirely destructive one because his techniques weren't applicable past him (he had such superior eyesight he could literally *see* his fired bullets...which makes "point shooting" much easier). Delf was a snappy dresser and good looking and he could do some amazing trick shooting....which got the attention of J Edgar Hoover.

When J. Edgar wasn't busy blackmailing politicians, assassinating political rivals, or taking mob bribe money through his massive gambling habit, he was wearing a dress and sucking dick. I'm convinced he wanted to savor the flavor of Delf himself and upon that basis Delf became the rock upon which all of FBI firearms training was based for decades. He looked the part and the trick shooting was great PR. And J. Edgar could fantasize about him when he was engaging in unnatural acts with the underage boys the mob provided him with. Win/win/win for ol' Edgar!

Of course, I didn't go that deep with Dr. Drew about it because to him Delf was a legend. And he still had faith in the Bureau despite the number of times they'd gone after his career for stubbornly insisting on scientific and moral principle.

I mention all of that because Dr. Drew removed the rollover guard from his riding mower. A couple of years after my class with him, he was on the side of a hill mowing and the mower rolled over on him, snapping his neck and killing him. I'm sure that this guy who had been on the scene of every major terrorist incident around the globe in the prior 25 years, who had dealt with the most deadly substances known to man, actively fought violent criminals to the death, and spent his leisure time strapped to essentially an airboat fan and a parachute hundreds of feet in the air never thought that the riskiest decision he would ever make was removing the hoop on his lawnmower but as it turns out his assessments on that particular risk turned out to be fatally flawed.

Consider the odd confluences of life where you drop a throwaway line about your Radical that just happens to get read by a dude who lost an unlikely friend with an extremely unlikely career of spiting in the grim reaper's face because of a lawnmower rollover.

I'm not saying that I'm a messenger from God...but if one were to believe that any amount of life is, in fact, non random...well...maybe buy that halo.

3. Baltimore - As a part of my unusual circle of acquaintances I have buddies who are (or were) Navy Nukes and intelligence types. There's a lot of conspiracy theories about that crash being a deliberate event, but most of it seems to be worked backwards from the outcome rather than by understanding the factors at work.

Pulling off a cyber-attack to produce that specific outcome would have required a lot of setup and the kind of precision in timing and location that is incredibly unlikely. Hacking a ship and doing so in a manner that will steer it directly at the most vulnerable part of the bridge makes for a good movie plot but it wouldn't be very plausible to people who know how ships work.

Poorly maintained equipment used by poorly educated personnel routinely produces disaster all over the place. And that seems to be the primary explanation for what happened here. Procedural mistakes by a low rent crew using a boat that probably wasn't maintained as carefully as it should be isn't as sexy as cyber attack, but it's a lot more believable.

If that worries anyone, it shouldn't because the crisis of competence gets way, way worse:

https://www.military.com/daily-news/2024/03/19/least-3-engineering-incidents-and-poor-leadership-kept-uss-boxer-deploying-investigations-reveal.html

A generation of social experimentation on the US military combined with enthusiastically searching the world for new wars to get into has had it's toll on readiness and capability. Naturally the people at the top of the chain will deny that any gaps exist and they'll pretend it's still the military that just beat Hitler and Hirohito, but the catastrophic incompetence we've only seen peeks at here and there is becoming a pervasive feature.

This is one reason why we shouldn't be in any hurry to go finding more wars, especially not with near peer adversaries who are watching us *very* closely and probably have a much better idea of our true capabilities than any of the saber rattling dipshits in the State Department.

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author

Well said, and delightfully told, on all counts.

Both of my Radicals have the conventional roll structure that has served these cars for nearly thirty years, as seen here:

https://images.squarespace-cdn.com/content/v1/57e571fa414fb57216f8a07f/1595799044858-YQG5I2C0M0ASGTW23JW7/radical_sr3_side_view_rgb.jpg

The new ones have a halo bar, like so:

https://primalracing.com/assets/img/radicals/sr3-xxr/sr3-xxr-3.jpg

This is embarrassing and I encourage all my enemies to make fun of me after I die, but: I'm not gonna bankrupt myself to race in something with a dorky halo brace. At that point I might as well buy myself a Spec Corvette and a pair of lacy panties.

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If you are going to die, can you please put it off until at least August. but BEFORE the renewal billing. Be careful out there.

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Mar 29Liked by Jack Baruth

"We should put a steel tube directly in front of the driver's line of sight, this will show how dangerous and manly it is to race one of our cars."

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author

Yeah, that's another thing I don't like about the halo.

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Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

Fantastic read.

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Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

I generally try not to hate on the modified Porsche stuff too harshly. Mostly because I don’t have one and cannot afford one so my lamentation should count to no one. That said there’s just something “off” with the Gunther proportions. It looks inflated and bulbous with overly high front fenders and too long an overhang. More Cartoonish than refined design.

Half ass street / race cars has to be some sort of generational thing. You’re either all in one way or the other. A six point is about tops with factory safety equipment. I don’t even like driving my full cage car without helmet as it makes me nervous. Conversely I refuse to cage my c5 while it has stock seats, belts and bags. Like the rest of the car it’s playing pretend until someone gets killed. Guy really got lucky.

As for the boat and Biden…ugh. My thoughts will put me on a watchlist much less the discrediting of any supporters here.

R.I.P. America. I so briefly knew you.

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Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

Well, regular 911’s look inflated and bulbous, so they had to turn it up to 11 for their target market. Garbage in, garbage out.

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Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

The truth is you can't make a 993 more curvaceous than the Turbo or 4S without ruining the proportions, like those ghastly butt-injection instagram trollops. Better to leave it alone

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Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

There is untold grandeur in subtlety. Changing dimensions in millimeters seems like a waste of time on paper but it couldn’t be further from the truth. When you start adding 2-3” of flare things go pear shaped in a hurry. The idea is to look at something and just be captivated without being able to quite figure out why. It’s not glaring and in your face, they just look “better” and more masculine. It’s exactly what makes a Singer the star over these.

So yes, it’s absolutely doable when done right. Maybe in another lifetime I’d be doing it myself.

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"That said there’s just something “off” with the Gunther proportions. It looks inflated and bulbous with overly high front fenders and too long an overhang. More Cartoonish than refined design."

YES

THANK YOU

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Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

If you hate the Gunther don’t google image search RWB..

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founding
Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

If RWB stayed a one-off or even a handful of cars owned by the same friends who did track days together for whatever, I’d hate them a lot less.

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Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

Agree. Also every time he cuts up another car, someone makes a corny cinematic video about it. My friend told me he was going to make a bingo card for the videos, squares include: car owned by by a 20 something manchild whose father bought it new, owner blathers on about “passion,” montage of Nakai cutting up fenders then rubbing roofing tar into the seams, cigarettes and staring, owner helps position the windshield banner, etc.

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Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

"my passion for cars is so strong i invited a japanese vagrant over to hack up my fathers investment grade 911 into a mockery of individuality for clout"

please fill your stomach with 10w30 posthaste

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He only LOOKS like a vagrant.

He's using the rear wing of a dusty Koenig Competition Evolution Testarossa as a workbench. You can see it back in the corner of his shop, under that pile of A'PEXi titanium exhausts and Seibon carbon fiber hoods.

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yes that exactly

mass producing them was a mistake

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Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

I kinda wouldn’t mind an RWB as a track rat. They were kinda cool until they overdid it and then sorta sold out to the bug men.

I’d gladly have the dude over to drink Coke, play some Indie Jap Punk and cut on some otherwise lame duck Carrera. Just leave the “real” ones alone. I’d probably stuff an Ls3 in it anyhow.

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Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

Many of those RWBs have totally unmodified engines. All that bodywork... all that tire ...

for a max of 280 hp.

Guess they won't be chirping on their way out.

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a track rat is probably what it ought to be in the same way a drift missile is a tool for a job that just happens to look fit for purpose

would be far more digestible if it were a flood damaged base model too

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Mar 28·edited Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

I am convinced that in the not-to-distant future a small number of very talented mechanics and bodymen will all but print money undoing all the damage done by the RWB nitwits.

Alas, it'll probably be someone like Singer, building cars for people who buy Singers.

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100% agree.

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RWB is for the same guy who'll Liberty Walk an F40.

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Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

i dont know who did that but i hate him

drywall screws in carbon bodywork are you kidding me

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"This week on Handyman Corner, we're gonna put overfenders on one of those fancy-boy European sports cars. If you don't have titanium aerospace rivets and a hydraulic gun, just use the leftover wood screws from when you built the kids' treehouse. Should work fine. Let's get started."

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what if red green was a billionaire

maybe that

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Mar 28·edited Mar 28

the first one, the stella artois, was neat as an expression of nakai's own personal taste and an extreme looking car with massively wide fenders and elbow deep dish ssr wheels

the rest are cookie cutter and each is built just as horribly as the first making none of them worth the money

but man the original when it was the only one in existence was tough looking

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At least flares are tolerable. I’m not a fan of stripes, especially the “carrera” ones that end up on a lot of 911s. If I ever end up with a 911 that has those, taking them off will be a day one change.

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Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

The front fenders are horrendous. The lack of sculpting on an otherwise curvy car really throws it off without pronounced arch and definition. Acceptable for an aero build long tail style but the front and rear look penned by different people.

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looks like a marshmallow after you take it out of the microwave

also that car really shows how hard it is to improve on the design of a car without making it worse

singer made it look easy

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Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

Good design is based on refinement. Singer knows this and exploits upon it. Every element has been retouched with a product designers eye, not necessarily someone purely automotive as they are very in touch with materials and finishes.

When you try to design by exaggeration you near always lose purity of design. Couple that with a loss of direction and cohesive theme and you get this sort of HotWheels looking variant that does some things well but nothing exceptional. The lack of cohesion means you can change lines or features around in the valances but it won’t fix the “off-ness”.

You cannot fix bad design by focusing in on the detail points but you can exemplify good design by doing the same.

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Very apt. Any thoughts on the MZR Datsun 240Z? I think it borrows too heavily from Singer when it really ought to pull design cues from other Nissans and it's own racing heritage.

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Wasn't asked, but big fan of their Evolution model. Just the right amount of width. Not too "pompado." Muy bien

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Everyone tries to be Singer. They are the “Rocket Bunny” of that genre. (I don’t like RB but it’s what everyone who does tries to copy).

The MZR cars seem to fall into modern tuner vs refinement, but it also seems they might offer different packages.

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You know how long it takes to design a car? They make thousands - THOUSANDS - of drawings before they start sculpting the full-size clay models.

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Eh, doesn't look too bad from here. At least it's not Mansory.

Fair warning, Not Safe For Lunch:

https://www.mansory.com/aston-martin

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I'll take the white one, if I had to, because the wheels aren't black. They've been around forever. Those AMs don't look as bad as I expected. Most of the other RE-IMAGINED Brands do. Years ago, their output looked more hideous.

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The Gunther stuff looks like absolute shit. They are everything a Singer isn’t.

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Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

In Baltimore. Fucking Baltimore! Of all the cities in the US. Not a single road worker was a Black American? And 22 people on the ship, making what, a dollar, three dollars a day?

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Let's put Third Worlders in charge of a mobile object the size of a skyscraper.

That's fucking BRILLIANT.

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Our fundamental problem in society is that the people who make decisions rarely have any practical experience actually doing any of the things they are making decisions about. The people who decided that having third worlders with a reputation for faking competence in a wide array of technical tasks pilot a gigantic projectile through bits of critical infrastructure can't steer or maintain a ship any more than the people on that boat could.

Cheap labor seems like a great idea in a board room...but almost nobody in that board room is looking for the cheapest cardiac surgeon when they need one. Or asking for the most discount manufactured parachute when they go skydiving. Cheap labor is abstract and, thus, equivalent. One worker is no more valuable than another. In fact, the more expensive ones are often much more trouble because they're always bothering you with reasons why your plans aren't going to work. The Indian sailors aren't going to fire an email up the chain saying "Hey, the boat is in a bad way and if we don't fix it we're going to drift into a bridge or something and shut down one of the most heavily trafficked ports in the entire fucking hemisphere." They'll just do the head bobble and pretend they understand what you're asking them to do! Score!

I mean, it's not like the ship is going to end up drifting into a bridge and shutting down a major shipping port or anything!

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"They'll just do the head bobble and pretend they understand what you're asking them to do" - That sums up my issue with cheap offshore software developers perfectly. I manage two independent teams, one contract team offshore in India and the other full time employees dispersed across the country. The onshore team is invested in the product - they are busting my balls constantly about things that are going to cause problems. 99% of the time, they're right. Their bug rate is so low it's practically 0. The offshore team never says a word about anything...and the churn for rework is tremendous.

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>head bobble

made me lol

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The Elites actually hate black people. One of the reasons why all the racism BS is so farcical.

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That is why they called the raping, pot smoking hillbilly the "first black president" and the actual first "black" president was in reality a half-white, half-immigrant ivy league striver rather than the great-grandson of slaves who endured the Night Riders, Jim Crow, made the Great Migration, and missed out on the generational wealth created by the GI Bill and saw their families destroyed by the War on Drugs. Immigrants are fine, poor Americans, white or black, can get fucked.

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not just the blacks it seems

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I was responding to a comment about the general population of Baltimore but yes.

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Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

" Justice For Fernando! "

I think that had it been Hamilton rather than Russell behind Alonso that crash never happens.

Because Lewis would have been thinking about what kind of dick move *he* would try if he were the car ahead, and so would have been alert to anything dodgy.

Georgie on the other hand was entirely focused on the hero move he was setting up, and just assumed Fernando would be a compliant accessory.

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author

I think this is well said.

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author

Fernando will not have done himself any favors in terms of moving to Luigi Hamiltone’s seat next year.

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Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

genuinely laughing at Luigi Hamiltone, which is so bad a joke it's funny.

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Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

Luigi's off season will consist of learning Italian Hand Gestures. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MWG-aCLx1h0

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That name needs to stick, it’s perfect.

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Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

George thinks all other drivers are compliant accessories... He needs to be Magnussen'ed to his career's end.

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I hope he throws a banana peel out of the cockpit next race.

If someone can pressure from behind, why not from in front?

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Mar 28·edited Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

All the effort to drive costs down as much as humanly possible and no thought given to their own countrymen.

How does one become so jaded and indifferent (if not outright hate) to their own people?

unless they arent american in the first place

and yes the gumption wanks 911 is still dumb and competing in a (somehow) highly competitive niche

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Mar 28·edited Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

Many of them are not, or do not consider themselves to be, americans.

And this is per their own admission, under government name, in books/on twitter/in fawning ny mag profile.

At this point many of the most powerful people are international. On numerous different axes it would be difficult to append the label "american" to them at all

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Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

"How does one become so jaded and indifferent (if not outright hate) to their own people?"

One goes to the right preschool, the one that required several letters of recommendation drafted before birth, and then continues to the right "country day" school, the right prep school, Dartmouth, and Harvard Business School, all straight through, or maybe with one "gap" year to go tour all the same European tourist attractions and nightclubs as all the other gap year people.

In the early 21st century, it is possible to go through that entire process, living about 25 years of life, without ever talking to a blue-collar person except in the role of a cashier or clerk.

So of course the lines on the expense part of the P&L are going to seem more vivid, more real, and more important than the people they represent.

Extreme and growing social stratification is a major part of why the elites have the ethics (or lack thereof) that they do today. The reasons why it has happened are numerous, but if you follow them far enough, they all come down to physical separation. I'll leave it as an exercise to each person reading this comment to determine how you would best get people of all American social classes at least occasionally occupying the same space at the same time, not in a service context.

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Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

Not sure I agree, at least as a millenial of the milennial class. Wealth continues to be what it was (only amplified) but the explanantion you provided doesn't jive even slightly with the actual people I know who went to the exact schools you mentioned. Maybe they're out of touch, but they lean toward liking america even if they perform leftist obeisance on whatever conscious level.

The people *truly* disemboweling the industry in the nation... are the same people who funded Reagan.. and Clinton.. And yes Biden's political careers. It's not even partisan, the political class are their lackeys. They don't care about America or think of themselves as americans. It's just a profit center.

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Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

Who, exactly, are the people you are thinking about?

I don't believe the people I'm talking about are evil. I think they're just deeply, deeply out of touch and clueless.

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Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

"I think they're just deeply, deeply out of touch and clueless."

This is charitable - and the Lord commands us to be charitable. Are they out of touch? We couldn't be more agreed. We differ on whether they're clueless or malicious.

10 million Americans having decent factory jobs would not realistically threaten these people. But they act as if such MFG base was a threat and don't *just* ship the jobs away for money but *as if they viewed the competing political power center of manufacturing to be a threat requiring neutralization.*

IMO this qualifies as malice. Without taking anything out of context, you could pick an example at random from yesterday's newspaper: let's go with Larry Summers. His ideas about economics & manufacturing policy have picked this country barer than bones in a desert. He didn't have to do it. And he is far too smart to be called clueless.

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author

Larry Summers should face a public accounting, Robespierre-style.

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Perhaps his biggest crime was meekly stepping down from his post at Harvard instead of standing up to the feminist harridans. Perhaps if he had taken a stance against the ideological totalitarians instead of being a pussy, it might have been a watershed moment.

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So stupid as to be indistinguishable from evil is a common refrain of mine.

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Mar 28·edited Mar 28

Even that gives them charitable benefit of doubt.

Should we?

[Edit: I believe at dinner table in mixed-political company we should, for persuasive purposes. But in our heart of hearts... should we?]

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I’m going to be stealing this, thanks.

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author

As a counterpoint:

I worked on about three dozen completed M&A transactions during my career as a junior mistmaker. I worked almost exclusively in service of depositories (i.e., banks) of all sizes. That industry is experiencing ongoing consolidation, and it is exceedingly rare for a non-bank entity to purchase a bank. One of the rationales for those deals (and essentially all “strategic” M&A) is “cost saves;” nota bene that “synergies” are incremental revenues unlocked or created by a combination, whereas cost saves are just that - efficiencies.

The process is obvious. If two businesses who do essentially the same thing combine, they will no longer need two of each of the non-revenue generating jobs. When working on the sell-side, one of the tasks that fell to me as a junior grunt was the first cut of taking the target’s employment roster and “right-sizing” it, with the goal of cutting ~30-40% of the seller’s non-interest expense.

Most sellers went out of their way to protect vulnerable employees (single mothers, those with one household income, those with disabled parents, etc.) and cut those who could better afford to lose their job.

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Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

That is your counterpoint?

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author

Yes.

Jack and I went back and forth (one-on-one) a few weeks ago on a similar topic.

No one is entitled to a job. Companies exist to (try to) reward shareholders for their largesse.

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Mar 28·edited Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

"Companies exist to (try to) reward shareholders for their largesse."

That's a deeply controversial statement in the law. Some feel it is axiomatic. Others think it's a drastic simplification of something far more complex. And the whole debate often elides the issue of what the *correct* policy about the purpose of companies should be.

My own view, as a lawyer who does a whole lot of corporate governance work, is that we take too narrow a view of what the interests of shareholders actually are. Everyone from MBAs to lawyers to the shareholders themselves assumes that the shareholders obviously just want the highest possible return of cash this quarter, regardless of any other implications. But in the end shareholders are people. Very few people are driven solely by money and the ones who are are almost universally viewed as d!ckbags.

Shareholders, as people, want to live in prosperous and sustainable communities. They want employees who will go out and sing their praises. They want to be involved in selling incredibly cool products and services. They want to give something back once their businesses succeed. Corporations, in promoting the interests of shareholders, should be free to take all of those things and more into account, not just the one interest out of all of them that is the most corrosive and the easiest to hate.

In your M&A scenarios, the most important decision came far before you got involved. and it was in almost all cases a decision focused narrowly on short-term financial interest. The most toxic aspect of Wall Street today is that it zealously enforces that focus in every case, even on businesses where the ordinary shareholders don't share it.

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author

I’m going to push back on this.

0-Most of these banks are private, or thinly traded (i.e., not really public); this makes deals harder, because you have to value the buyer’s stock (most bank deals are not cash deals), as well.

1-Community bank shareholders ARE invested (in multiple senses of the word) in the services that their banks provide to small communities; I strenuously believe that these services are very valuable, and I would advise most people to bank at a community bank, because they excel in terms of customer service.

2-That said … if you’ve tied up $100K or $1MM or even more of your own money in First State Bank of Somewhere for years (or decades) with little to no dividend, limited if any liquidity, and challenging prospects to create shareholder value going forward (particularly in the face of the tech spend necessary to keep your head above water vs larger institutions), maybe you start to think about a sale? Particularly if leadership is aging and there is no credible successor in place.

3-People are typically risk averse and loss avoidant. They rue the loss of their job to a successful M&A process, but would they feel the same way about being turned down for a “no-show” job? I.e., they’d expect the local community bank to pay them $50K or $100K a year to do just about nothing and create no value. I think most people understand that that’s not realistic.

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Mar 28Liked by Sherman McCoy, Jack Baruth

I'm an ordinary shareholder in as much my 401k has much of my own wealth investment in these companies. For me personally, I want all my investments to return me the most money they can. For my own personal view,.I honestly don't care about a lot of the sustainable.and community crap of these companies. Maybe I'm just jaded but any company I've ever worked for, the investors and CEOs only ultimately care about the stock price and bottom line.

I brought this up just a few days ago on TTAC on an insurance article. I basically said that it's a contradiction for everyday folks to complain about their auto insurance prices when many if not most everyday people have some form of investment into these companies. Everyone over in TTAC sited greed. Damn straight I want my investments into insurance companies to return me the most it can.

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When I am a shareholder, I do not give a damn about quarterly results. I want management to be working on a ten-year time horizon so I can give them my money and forget about it for a while.

Meanwhile management incentives ARE for quarterly results. This is not for my benefit.

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And no company is entitled to good and loyal employees. The company must be worthy of that proficiency and loyalty.

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author

Of course they aren’t!

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One of my light bulb moments in the last decade or so has been seeing Conservative, Inc’s union bashing for what it is.

Yeah, the UAW and the Teamsters can go to hell, but so can anybody pushing “right to work” laws.

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Mar 28·edited Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

My counterpoint is this: Much of what is done by corporations and wealthy people is legal only because they wrote the law to make it legal. To take a rather unimportant example, the only reason that Ticketmaster is allowed to exist is because they crippled the FCC. The only reason poorly maintained ships manned by near slaves and sailed under flags of convenience are allowed in US waters is because the people you are defending wrote laws to make it possible.

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Mar 28·edited Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

There’s a long list of things that someone went out of their way to make/keep legal. Because there are plenty of folks who have insufficient moral qualms over inflecting needless financial and/or physical harm to make a buck.

In a sense, we’re all to blame because we don’t demand better.

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Legal fictions, I believe, is the correct term.

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Mar 28Liked by Sherman McCoy, Jack Baruth

Ain't nice, but that's a fact. I worked in IT that had mom + pop size banks and credit unions as clients. One client would buy the other. Either the buyer's name went above the door or they made a holding company and kept them separate. Even separate, the back rooms had no need to be separate. You really can't do much for customer (the public) facing aspects of the business. If a branch had 10 people before and wasn't going to be closed, chances are you'd still need 10 people. Usually what takes a hit is the back room for the loan dept and call centers.

Most of the reports we generated were just online documents. But, there were small volume forms that would print on customer (Financial Inst.) printers. Stuff like late notices, late fee notices, Time Deposit stuff.

All the institutions had their printers hooked up to us. I wrote a program that would print this form, for this FI on that printer. We had in some cases holding companies that owned 3 separate banks. Banks A, B + C. Sometimes this form for the 3 went to Bank A, another to B another to C. When that occurred, you knew that the people that used to handle that stuff at the other FIs probably weren't there anymore. If A,B, C were geographically close together, at best some of the people moved to a different location. But definitely not all of them.

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Mar 28·edited Mar 28

Indeed - a corporation’s purpose is to deliver and maximize shareholder value. However, isn’t this a far broader topic than the role of a corporation? Corporations don’t exist in a vacuum. I don’t think your point really gets to the heart of the issue, which in my mind isn’t why corporations function the way they do, but rather the broader macroeconomic policies which allow corporations to function the way they do in the #currentyear.

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Mar 28·edited Mar 28Liked by Jack Baruth

I kept reading waiting for the counterpoint until I realized it was just another flex. Should have known better.

The pablum at the end about the token sparing of some of the little people at the expense of othered who could “afford” to get kicked to the curb just reinforces MC’s point about social stratification.

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author

Disagree.

I, along with a team of ~35 others, lost my job to M&A in 2019. Live by it, die by it. None of us cried over that.

I got a text 5 minutes ago from a friend whose entire team just got blown out (not through M&A); it happens every day.

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I suspect your safety net is far larger than some factory worker who got his job shipped overseas due to M&A, and your timeline for getting a new job is far shorter. Beyond that, totally the same.

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founding

1. Merge banks because there’s money to be made.

2. Keep certain employed based upon them being a welfare case vs. job performance.

3. Merged bank fails due to mismanagement.

4. Seek taxpayer-funded bailout.

Welcome to clown world. Even if this country comes out ahead on paper, we still lose. This is why they swiftly shut down OWS and turned people against each other by way of identity politics.

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author

“Bailout”

You do realize that the taxpayers made a profit on TARP, the last taxpayer-funded “bailout,” right?

Meanwhile, they got hosed on the automaker and airline bailouts.

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If you're too big to fail, you are too big. That should be national policy. Bring back anti trust! Burn google to the ground! Hang whoever is in charge of Microsoft Outlook from a light post. I'm serious about all of these ESPECIALLY the Outlook one.

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Mar 28Liked by Sherman McCoy

Not agreeing or disagreeing, but "mistmaker?" - Nice!

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